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Data Stories Gallery

Where does your state spend and get money?

Understanding where states spend money and raise taxes can help state legislators or policy makers make better decisions. In total, 50 states and the District of Columbia spent $2.6 trillion in fiscal year 2015, according to the most recent survey by the US Census Bureau (this figure includes the federal grants that states received).

The followings are a few highlights from the above report.

 Sales and excise tax ($545 billion or 29% of total revenues in 2015) is the largest source of revenue for the state and local governments. Compared with fiscal year 2010, sales and excise tax increased $109 billion or 25%. Individual income tax revenue increased $106 billion or 41%, over this same period. Seven states do not have an individual income tax, while the other states differ in terms of their individual income tax rate levels. The highest marginal tax rate used by a state was 12.3% in California. Click on the state to filter.

Sales and excise tax ($545 billion or 29% of total revenues in 2015) is the largest source of revenue for the state and local governments. Compared with fiscal year 2010, sales and excise tax increased $109 billion or 25%. Individual income tax revenue increased $106 billion or 41%, over this same period. Seven states do not have an individual income tax, while the other states differ in terms of their individual income tax rate levels. The highest marginal tax rate used by a state was 12.3% in California. Click on the state to filter.

 Major areas of state spending are education and healthcare. States spent $825 billion on education in fiscal year 2015 (Of this $629 billion went to elementary and secondary education). A toggle button provides the option to show the data as a chart vs a table.

Major areas of state spending are education and healthcare. States spent $825 billion on education in fiscal year 2015 (Of this $629 billion went to elementary and secondary education). A toggle button provides the option to show the data as a chart vs a table.

 Compared with fiscal year 2010, North Dakota, Alaska, and Vermont increased spending per person by more than $1,000, however Florida, Utah, Wyoming, Louisiana, Washington DC decreased spending per person by $500. A drop down filter on the top right gives the flexibility to pick "Per Capita (inflation-adjusted)". 

Compared with fiscal year 2010, North Dakota, Alaska, and Vermont increased spending per person by more than $1,000, however Florida, Utah, Wyoming, Louisiana, Washington DC decreased spending per person by $500. A drop down filter on the top right gives the flexibility to pick "Per Capita (inflation-adjusted)". 

Note: If you are interested in a comprehensive view of the combined US federal, state and local governments’ revenues and expenditures, USAFacts Institute recently released a 10-K report for U.S. governments. 

Source: US Census Bureau, as reported by state and local governments through the Census of Governments. The Census has not updated state and local income statement data since 2015.